Everything, Everything: Book Review

18692431Title: Everything, Everything

Author: Nicola Yoon

Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers

Release Date: 1. September 2015

Rating: 3 stars

Links: GoodreadsAmazon

This book made me wonder about how thin the line between love and obsession is.

Blurb:

My disease is as rare as it is famous. Basically, I’m allergic to the world. I don’t leave my house, have not left my house in seventeen years. The only people I ever see are my mom and my nurse, Carla.

But then one day, a moving truck arrives next door. I look out my window, and I see him. He’s tall, lean and wearing all black—black T-shirt, black jeans, black sneakers, and a black knit cap that covers his hair completely. He catches me looking and stares at me. I stare right back. His name is Olly.

Maybe we can’t predict the future, but we can predict some things. For example, I am certainly going to fall in love with Olly. It’s almost certainly going to be a disaster.

Review

Moment of truth. I actually considered given this book a 1.5 rating because of that reveal with the mother in the last half of the book, but then, for some reason, well–call it logical or deeper thinking and rationalizing the mother’s actions, whatever it was, it saved this book from being a ‘do not touch’ to ‘consider reading you might like it’.

With that being said. I devoured this book in one setting the moment I finished watching the newly released trailer. More because I really enjoy everything Nick Robinson is in, and also because Amanda is just so damn talented.

Things I liked:

From the blurb alone, I knew this was a book I wanted to read. Someone who is allergic to the world? How tragic, and yet, curious. How does that happen? How does she live? How is this story going to end? All this questions and more were the reasons why I picked up the book after the trailer. And I’m glad that I did. The writing to me was good, I love how fast paced and easy it was to get into it. I love the way the relationship between Olly and Madeline developed–it wasn’t too rush or too forced.

“I was happy before I met him. But I’m alive now, and those are not the same thing.”

The setting, the description, the characters, and dare I say the cheesiness of it all was well worth the read for me. What can I say, sometimes, I’m a hopeless romantic.

My favorite part of this book, though–spoiler alert– is the part where Maddy goes out for the first time and the reason why she did it.

I love how in the moment, she didn’t think about her life, that going out wasn’t good for her, or about what her mother would think. I love how going out meant everything, everything to her, but in that moment she didn’t even realize what she had done, didn’t enjoy the brief freedom–because all she cared about in the moment was helping Olly. I really, really liked that part, which I guess, was one of the reasons why I gave this book the rating I did.

Spoiler alert: Love is worth everything. Everything.”

I also loved how Olly had his problems and his life. I’d have loved to know more of what happened after they left. I was glad he wasn’t just there to be the love-interest, but had depth and a plotline, problems and flaws of his own.

Now the reasons why I wanted to give this book a lower rating than I actually gave it.

Things I disliked:

The plotline in the last half of the book. I mean, come on! I went through all that rollercoaster of Maddy’s emotions and hope and then it turned out–spoiler alert– that her mother was the one with a terminal illness, because, after losing her father and brother, her fear of losing her daughter made her, lock her up for eighteen years to protect her?

What? Why? Why will you spend this whole time telling us how forbidden and impossible their love was, but then cop out in the last minute to wrap everything up in a shiny bow? I’m not complaining that they got their happen ending, but I really really hated the way that they got it. Suddenly, everything, everything was alright, the life she knew was a big fat lie and her mother that she loved so much was a monster.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not complaining that they got their happy ending, but I really really hated the way that they got it. Suddenly, everything, everything was alright, the life she knew was a big fat lie and her mother that she loved so much was a monster.

“You can do every goddamn thing right, and your life can still turn to shit.”

And speaking of the mother. What the heck was with that ending, she just up and left her, saying their home wasn’t a home anymore. Like didn’t she care that she was sick?Like she locked her daughter up for 18 years!! was someone going to do anything about it? And why leave a woman who is broken and clearly seriously sick all alone by herself? Yes, I get that you are hurt and angry after all she did, but seriously?

Also, she locked her daughter up for 18 years!! Was someone going to do anything about it? And why leave a woman who is broken and clearly seriously sick all alone by herself? Yes, I get that you are hurt and angry after all she did, but seriously?

And she is a doctor. So are they going to allow her back to treating other people in her condition? Didn’t any of the doctor see that something was wrong with her? Did they have relatives?

I seriously have way too many questions and after-thoughts, that, I am still considering my sanity for giving it the stars I did. It’s probably the wine I had for lunch, still in my system. Or, maybe, I just really wanted a happy ending for once.

“You’re not living if you’re not regretting.”

Actual Movie Name: The Very Over-the-top Protective Mother.

Rating: 3 everything-everything stars = This book was alright. I enjoyed it. I would have loved it, but something major in the plotline just made me not love it. Give it a try, perhaps you wouldn’t mind the hole.

“Life is a gift. Don’t forget to live it.”

Hopefully, the movie stays true to the book. I’d like to see this characters come to life with all their past, flaws and problems.

Mel Out!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s