Purity: Book Review

9268789Title: Purity

Author: Jackson Pearce

Publisher: Pottermore

Release Date: 24. April 2016

Rating: 3.8/5 stars

Links: Goodreads  Amazon

This book took me by surprise, I started off hating it, and then liking it in the end.

Blurb:

A novel about love, loss, and sex — but not necessarily in that order.
Before her mother died, Shelby promised three things: to listen to her father, to love as much as possible, and to live without restraint. Those Promises become harder to keep when Shelby’s father joins the planning committee for the Princess Ball, an annual dance that ends with a ceremonial vow to live pure lives — in other words, no “bad behavior,” no breaking the rules, and definitely no sex.

Torn between Promises One and Three, Shelby makes a decision — to exploit a loophole and lose her virginity before taking the vow. But somewhere between failed hookup attempts and helping her dad plan the ball, Shelby starts to understand what her mother really meant, what her father really needs, and who really has the right to her purity.

Review

S.E.X. Wow, now that I’m officially 18 I think I can say the ‘S’ word without making a face or acting like I’m in kindergarten. S.E.X… no wait I just made a face, but it was defiantly not the same face that Shelby made when she decided to lose her virginity on a loophole.

Remember when in the old days virtue was some kind of a big deal? Well, in Purity it’s not! I’m pretty sure when Shelby hears that someone *cough* Edward Cullen *cough* made such a big deal out of the whole virtue thing, she’d laugh her pretty head off.
So, that being said let me break it down to you using Jackson Pearce’s own word.

Purity is a novel about sex, strangers, and loopholes — but not necessarily in that order.
So before Shelby’s mother died, Shelby promised her three things: to listen to her father, to love as much as possible, and to live without restraint. But as the novel goes on she is finding it really hard to keep the promises. And it wasn’t getting any better when her father decided to turn her into Martha Stewart and ship her off Pleasantville. Well it didn’t happen like that, all the old man wanted was her daughter to join some Princess Ball committee, and vow to live pure lives — in other words, no “bad behavior,” no breaking the rules, and definitely no sex. Which in today’s words is code for ‘Dad why don’t you just put a neon sign on my forehead that reads ‘loser’?”

So since Shelby didn’t want to be a princess, she made a decision to exploit a loophole and lose her virginity before taking the vow. Yeah I know right, didn’t she ever read Cinderella? Back then girls would die to become a princess!

“Making fake promises while wearing a fancy dress… that isn’t enough. Promises take more work than that.”

So the rest of the book goes on and she tries to hook up with some random guys, but failed miserably. By this time her two best friends, Ruby and Jonas, were like her armor. They had a list and one of them even succeeds on finding her the guy who got the job done.
Somehow along the line, Shelby starts to understand what her mother really meant, what her father really needs, and who really has the right to her purity.

This line: “who really has the right to her purity” is kind of misleading. At one point when I was reading this book, I thought it was a very disrespectful and demeaning way to get a girl to lose her virginity, but then I thought about it, and I realized that Jackson pictured today’s world in a picture perfect single snapshot. I loved her writing, the funny way she maks the readers come to turns with what promises, friendship, family and somehow love means.

I love how she built and described the friendship between her characters. The way she introduced the love story that was yet to develop between Shelby and Jonas, and how she ended the book itself. Maybe she could have gone into much details of what comes next, but I liked how she left it, because it gave room for my own imagination to linger. After all, every ending is the beginning of something else.

Purity is a funny and an amazing read for anyone who simply loves to read. I highly recommend it.

Mel Out!

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